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31Jan/141

This week’s discoveries

-If you haven't read it, this interview with Bartholomäus Traubeck , who got honorary mentions Ars Electronica PRIX in 2012 with his piece: "Years".

-This video he mentions in the same interview:

-A great guide from Amanda Ghassaei to Max/MSP on Instructables. Max/MSP is very similar to Pure Data (actually Pd is very similar to it, since the same person/people from Max team built Pd later on) but has a better interface imho. An essential tool for creating interactive works and for much more.

-The concept of a Harmonic Table. This attracted my attention, since it would be a great idea for building generative soundscapes and artworks. Coding this structure in Python would be a nice idea, I will keep that in my mind. Why Python? Two reasons, first it is very easy to write and code. Second, you can do lots of stuff inside Python and extend the scope of your code greatly by sending the data to other platforms, frameworks and programs. So go Python!

HarmonicTableMusicNoteLayout

Click for larger image of "Harmonic Table"

 

-This guide on encryption by LifeHacker.Don't forget to check the other links in the article if you find it interesting!

This guide on the Virtual Machine concept. What is a Virtual Machine and why use it? Basically it is a software that enables you to use an OS (say Windows) while you are using your current one (say OS X) without needing to restart your system and easily benefit from the use of multiple OS's.

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2Aug/130

‘Project Genesis’ @ Ars Electronica Center

Projekt_Genesis_Logo_EN

It was very fortunate of me to be able to take part in this exhibition, which is about how synthetical biology, which also focuses on the virtual life that is created in laboratory environment, can affect our future lives.

Our project is about saving digital data into DNA, which enables all of us to save our data for thousands of years, whereas the lifespan of a common harddisk drive is only couple of years. Also this allows us to carry our data at all times, since large stacks of information can be stored in a tablespoon full of DNA. Although the current drawback is cost, it is known that the first transistors were impractically expensive and this might point out that at a certain point in future, we might be able to use DNA as a new medium to save our data. All this process bases on the algorithm of George Church, a molecular biology professor at Harvard Medical School.

My part in this exhibition was to code this algorithm with a GUI in Processing environment and to create a bundle experience for visitors, to type in whatever they like and to print this data out in binary and DNA strings, printed onto a paper.

If you happen to visit the exhibition, please do consider to contribute to our DNA wall, which consists of strings of information that is printed by previous visitors, who sticked their information onto this wall. Collaborative memory!

Now it's time to chill and lean back for a while...

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